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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
of mourners attended the funeral procession in tunisia of the murdered opposition politician chokri belaid, a political killing that rocked the fledgling democracy and highlighted divisions between liberals, secular tunisian, and conservative islamists. >> there was genuine anguish across tunisia today. no or more so than in the home of chokri belaid. his wife and father sitting dignified. words of support to his daughter, whose father was assassinated on wednesday. a political murder that threatens to undermine to nietzsche's fledgling revolution -- undermined tunisia's fledgling revolution. >> my father wanted it to the democratic with a bright future. he always said the country was full of good things and believe political progress was possible here. >> as the coffin was carried through the narrow alleyways of this modest working-class neighborhood, the huge crowd name.ed chanting belaid's they blame the islamist-led government for his murder. chokri belaid had been its most constant and vocal critic. >> amid all the anger, there's a sense that tensions have been bubbling under the surf
in tunisia; fleeing the violence in syria and delaying a decision on gay scouts. but first, with the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a new round of fighting broke out today in damascus, syria-- the heaviest in weeks. rebel fighters made a thrust toward the central part of the capital, and smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build
. two years ago a fruit vendor in 2 nietzsche -- in tunisia set himself on fire, starting the arab spring. thousands took to the streets to protest against the killings, and the prime minister has responded, promising he would form a new government. >> he who is the country's first political assassination since the revolution, and it has exposed intrenched divisions and powerful and distrust. crowds of opposition supporters gathered at the interior ministry and tried to storm the building. they blamed the islamist-led government. these are the streets where protests brought down the dictatorship two years ago. eyewitnesses say when the police responded there was panic and chaos. >> police tried to absorb the anger of the demonstrators, but they could not just watch people throwing stones at them. >> he was the leader of a small party and a fierce critic of the largest party in the government coalition. he was shot dead by a man on a motorbike as he left home. he denounced it as an act of terror. it is unlikely to satisfy the dead man's supporters, who say he received repeated death
, and conservative islamists. >> there was genuine anguish across tunisia today. no or more so than in the home of chokri belaid. his wife and father sitting dignified. words of support to his daughter, whose father was assassinated on wednesday. a political murder that threatens to undermine to nietzsche's fledgling revolution -- undermined tunisia's fledgling revolution. >> my father wanted it to the democratic with a bright future. he always said the country was full of good things and believe political progress was possible here. >> as the coffin was carried through the narrow alleyways of this modest working-class neighborhood, the huge crowd name.ed chanting belaid's they blame the islamist-led government for his murder. chokri belaid had been its most constant and vocal critic. >> amid all the anger, there's a sense that tensions have been bubbling under the surface for months. tunisia was the birthplace of the arab spring, and all of these mourners are determined there will not be a premature end here as well. >> there were sustain volleys of tear gas from riot police. as the wider regi
zero years since tunisia celebrates the transparent election, the first since the uprising of 2011. that election made to miyisha somewhat of a beacon -- made tunisia somewhat of a beacon. the islamist party merged, but without a majority. they promised cooperation. it seemed to nietzsche -- tunisia was finding a way to compromise. will today's assassination derails the emerging democracy? >> this is the most difficult process of the change, and the new political system has been put together. the new constitution, the divisions between where the country is going, the maneuvering, but generally things are heading in the right direction. >> even so, this will put fear into the heart of the political lives. tonight they called elections. it is a reminder that even the most hopeful of arab democracies remains a work in progress. >> i spoke to michelle. she is the director of the council at the middle east center. we have one of the country's best his the most -- countries that is the most westernized is the most stable. it is a surprise? >> assassination has not been a feature of the t
in the capital of tunisia following the assassination of an opposition protester. clashes between protesters and police threaten democracy as the politicians are disagreeing on how to deal with this crisis. we have been out on the streets of the capital. >> the situation across tunisia is incredibly tense. the assassination has shaken the country to its very core. ? we have not seen scenes like this for two years. there are right police clashing on this main street. the young men are protesting about the government. the government allied to the muslim brotherhood, accused of a road and the people the freedoms that people had one in the revolution. -- accused of eroding the freedoms that the people won in the revolution. there is a highly charged funeral tomorrow. many people across the country are anticipating more trouble. >> a very tense time they're in tunisia. it has been described as the blackest day in australian sport. crushing revelations of mass doping have ripped across the image. doctors, coaches, scientists were all involved, working alongside in an organized crime syndicate with
. turning now to tunisia where the country's prime minister announced he is resigning. his decision comes following the rejection of his attempt to form and a political government. he was trying to help the country out of the political crisis sparked earlier this month. an opposition politician was assassinated. what does this mean for the country? that is a topic i discussed with david rhode. why did the prime minister feel he had no choice but to resign? >> he had promised he would create a cabinet of technocrats that woodbridge to the political divide is widening in tunisia. he failed to do that. the islamist party refuse to compromise so apparently did the liberal party is and he kept his word and step down. >> he wanted a non-partisan government. was he so out of step with his country? >> he was out of step at all with the populace of two nations. there has been no agreement on a constitution. there were supposed to be elections in constitution but that is not happening. people are eager and they thought this was a historic opportunity with the assassination of a leftist political le
in federal prison. in tunisia, new protests broke out in the capital, demanding the end of the government. it was the second day of unrest sparked by the killing of a leading opposition figure. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: in tunis today, crowds converged on the interior ministry on the same spot where the so-called arab spring began two years ago. "the people want the downfall of the regime" the chant once again. but this time the tear gas came from police loyal not to a dictator but to tunisia's democratically elected government, one which now stands accuse of complicity in political assassination. the victim was chokri belaid, shot outside his home yesterday by a gunman on a motorbike. belaid had appeared on television the night before he died. the s.e.c. tar politician told his interview that tunisia's governing islamist party harbored religious factions which incited violence. his killing prompted the biggest explosion of anger since the revolution itself. groups claiming that revolution had been stolen by islamists who w
-maliki. in tunisia, huge crowds of mourners protested as opposition leader chokri belaid was laid to rest. he was assassinated earlier this week. tens of thousands converged on the cemetery, with belaid's coffin draped in a tunisian flag. violence erupted as police fired tear gas and demonstrators threw stones and set cars ablaze. thousands of demonstrators turned out in cairo and other cities across egypt, protesting president mohammed morsi and his islamist-led government. the crowds defied hard-line muslim clerics, who called on their supporters to kill opposition leaders. as night fell, security forces used tear gas to disperse protesters who threw rocks and fire bombs at the presidential palace. gunmen in nigeria have killed at least nine women working to immunize children against the polio virus. the attacks today were in kano, in the african nation's muslim north. the killers were believed to come from boko haram, a radical islamic sect. polio remains endemic in nigeria, but some muslim clerics have charged the vaccinations are a plot to sterilize young girls. the british government to
libya, tunisia, all across north africa and -- >> rose: you do indeed. so therefore the idea of taking out in yemen an american citizen who had threatened america was just fine with dick cheney? >> yes. >> rose: by a drone attack. >> yes. he was clearly part of -- >> rose: should there will be checks and balances in terms of that? should there be some way -- >> take him to court? >> rose: i'm asking. >> i think when we hire the president of the united states he gets to live in the big house makes all that money, he's getting paid to make difficult, difficult decisions. >> rose: and this president has been prepared to step up and make those decisions? >> some of them he has. in other ways he is limiting the capacity of future presidents to do it. every time you take down our military capabilities, every time you start laying up carriers instead of refueling them, every time you cut the defense budget with a meat ax, which is what he's doing, every time you do that, you're going to limit the capacity of the president ten, 15 years down the road to take action when he has to. we were able
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)